REPORT: Posting to Facebook makes us feel less lonely

bored_studentNEW YORK:  So the good news for all those people who are frequently updating their Facebook status is that this action "can help you feel less lonely". This is according to a new study conducted by researcher Fenne Deters, of the Universitat Berlin. And the even better news is that this effect can be felt even if no one pays attention to your update.  So, "no likes" is "no problem", just go ahead and share your feelings.

"Similar to a snack temporarily reducing hunger until the next meal, social snacking may help tolerate the lack of 'real' social interaction for a certain amount of time." say the writers in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

"We got the idea to conduct this study during a coffee-break sharing random stories about what friends had posted on Facebook," said Deters. She and her colleague recruited about 100 undergraduates (all Facebook users) at the University of Arizona.

The college students who posted more status updates on the social networking site than they normally did felt less lonely over the course of a week, even if no one "Liked" or commented on their posts, researchers found.

All participants filled out initial surveys to measure their levels of loneliness, happiness and depression, and they gave the researchers access to their Facebook profiles by friending a dummy user created for the experiment.

The students were sent an analysis of their average weekly status updates (online wall-memos) and some of the participants were then told to post more statuses than usual over the next seven days.During that week, all completed a short online questionnaire at the end of each day about their mood and level of social connection.

Compared with the group of students who didn't adjust their social media habits, those who went on a status-writing blitz felt less lonely over the week, the team found.

"Their happiness and depression levels went unchanged, suggesting that the effect is specific to experienced loneliness," the researchers wrote.

Interestingly, the team found that loneliness levels did not depend on whether the students' status updates garnered any comments or "Likes" from Facebook friends.

One might assume that a lack of response could be considered a form of rejection, but the act of writing a status update itself might help people feel more connected, the researchers said.

When crafting a clever status, Facebook users have a target audience in mind. Simply thinking about their friends (or at least their Facebook friends) can have a "social snacking" effect.

Norm Bond
NORM BOND shows people how to use digital marketing tools to find customers, grow sales and increase profits. And if you're not using digital tools he shows you how to do that too. He currently splits his time between Bangkok, Thailand and the U.S. He is available for consulting and speaking.
Norm Bond

@normbond

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